Category Archives: Fishing

Fishing in Texas

Seadrift, TX. Wade Fishing

This is what it’s about right here. These 11 and 12 year old buddies say they’ve been fishing together since they were 5 and 6.

Imagine what kind of sticks they will be in 20 years. Their lure selection, knots, retrieves and simple handling of fish was impressive to watch.

Today we had trout up to 22” and was in fish most of the morning. Thigh to crotch deep on the grown ups over grass was the ticket. Our main colors were plum/chart, and purple reign. Even managed a couple on topwaters mid morning.

All our fish were realeased in good shape to fight another day.

Capt. Nathan Beabout

Cell:(210)452-9680

nmsportsmansadventures.com

Capt. Nathan Beabout

Cell: (210) 452-9680

N&M Sportsman’s Adventures

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AB Kennels

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Navigational Trip/Classroom Learning; Seadrift, TX.

This navigational trip started with boating etiqutte, confidence in the handling of the boat, learning new areas, general fishing discussion of these new areas. We capped the day off with our “Why’s and Why Nots of Fishing,” classroom session.

—-This service is exclusively offered by Captain Nathan Beabout in the Seadrift/POC bay complex.

Captain Nathan Beabout

Cell-210-452-9680

www.nmsportsmansadventures.com

Capt. Nathan Beabout

Cell: (210) 452-9680

N&M Sportsman’s Adventures

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AB Kennels

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Seadrift, TX Sight Casting

The Minor feed prediction was pretty spot on for us this morning. The first 2 ponds we fished this morning with POC Custom Rods, and DSL’s glow was on!

Fish were pushed up on the windward banks feeding on shad, and mullet. It was a fun morning with these repeat clients who are down for a short vacation. Typically we wade, but this time was just looking for a relaxing morning on the boat. I don’t know if anybody relaxed, but the stories are always fun and the action was good.redfish

All our fish were released to fight another day. Thank you to all our clients who are helping our resource this year. It’s simply time enjoying the water, with some good pulls, and teaching.

Capt. Nathan Beabout

Cell:(210)452-9680

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redfish
Redfish

Capt. Nathan Beabout

Cell: (210) 452-9680

N&M Sportsman’s Adventures

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AB Kennels

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Seadrift, TX. Sight Casting Report

It was a fun day in the marsh chasing reds. After a couple early morning adjustments, we found where and what they wanted. Most of the reds were milling in creeks, or right on the edge of shallow flats.

After a few bait changes, we figured out that DSL’s pure pearl, color x, pumpkinseed, and Buggs Lures did the trick.

We sat through a couple small showers waiting for the sun, bet it helped to cool us off. All our fish were released to fight another day, thank you for that gentlemen.

Give us a call to line up your sight casting or wading trip for July-September.

Capt. Nathan Beabout

Cell: (210) 452-9680

N&M Sportsman’s Adventures

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AB Kennels

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Seadrift Wade Fishing

Great morning wade before the rain closed in and was cutting off our escape back to Seadrift.

With the light winds we were able to return to some old stopping grounds. Our best baits were Spook jrs, and DSL chicken of the c in knee to thigh deep water.

Capt. Nathan Beabout

Cell: (210) 452-9680

N&M Sportsman’s Adventures

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AB Kennels

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Royal Bull Elk from the Beautiful Colorado Mountains (Part 2)

In an earlier article, Royal Bull Elk from the Beautiful Colorado Mountains (Part 1), I wrote about my killing a beautiful Royal 6 x 6 bull elk in Colorado   I will now discuss several successful elk hunts which took place in the same area of the ranch.   In 2011, I had invited my life-long friend Melvin Kreusler from New Braunfels, Texas, to join me on my Colorado Elk hunt.  We had prepared a ground blind overlooking a trail on the ridge which paralleled the ridge that my royal bull I wrote about earlier was located.  We named that blind “Melvin’s Nest”.   The two ridges are about 150 yards apart.  On opening morning of the 2011 3rd elk season, I took Melvin to his nest and I decided to go to my favorite spot (appropriately called “Clarence’s Point”) overlooking the area where Melvin was sitting about 400 yards away.  I could see across the fence onto the neighboring ranch and see whether elk were heading for our ranch and could warn via radio for our hunter or hunters on the ground to move to another location where I thought the elk would cross our ranch.

Shortly after day break, I observed a large herd of about 120 elk, including two huge bulls and several smaller ones, milling around across the fence about 150 yards from where Melvin was sitting.  I expected that the herd would eventually cross the fence onto our ranch and take the trail in front of Melvin to go uphill and bed down for the day on the neighboring ranch on the west side of our ranch.  It was not long before some of the elk began crossing the fence and head for the spot where Melvin was waiting.  I quickly called Melvin and told him “here they come”.  The lead animal in the procession was the herd cow, then her calf, followed by another cow and calf, followed by a very nice 4 x 4 bull.  When the bull came into Melvin’s sight Melvin shot and the bull dropped in his track. Then all hell broke loose.  The part of the herd still on the opposite side of the boundary fence, including the 2 huge bulls, crashed like a giant brown wave down the south facing slope covered in scrub oak bushes. The elk that had already crossed the fence continued on the trail up hill in my direction.  I saw several of the elk as they ran through the timber behind my stand but I had no opportunity for a shot.

As I was walking down the hill to help Melvin, I slipped on a patch of ice and dropped my rifle.  I then helped Melvin field dress his bull.  I was able to back my Ford F150 4×4 right up to the dead bull.  We loaded him up and immediately drove to the butcher shop about 25 miles away to have it processed.  The butcher agreed to butcher and quick freeze the meat and have it ready for us to pick up on Friday when we planned to go back to Texas.  By 3 PM we were back at the ranch and I went out for the evening hunt. 

While all the activity with Melvin was taking place that morning on the next ridge over from the large meadow, Charlie was sitting in his nest on the meadow.  The only game he saw was a fairly nice 4 x 3 mule deer and two smaller bucks.  Since I was the only hunter in camp with a mule deer buck license, Charlie allowed me to hunt his nest for the evening hunt in case the buck returned.  Charlie then hunted my point that evening.  Since we do not party hunt, my friend Melvin’s hunt was over and he could then only watch the wildlife and enjoy the beautiful scenery.  I didn’t know whether I had knocked my scope off when I dropped it that morning so I borrowed Melvin’s 30.06 for the evening hunt.  

Just about sundown that evening, I observed 4 cows and a large bull come down the trail at the top of the meadow in my direction.  They stopped about 250 yards from me and began grazing.  I had a clear shot at the bull so I put the crosshair on his chest and squeezed the trigger.  I had never fired this gun before but I trusted that Melvin had it zeroed in.    When the shot rang out the 4 cows ran away, but the bull just kept standing.  After a few seconds, the bull began to wobble and finally just dropped dead on the spot.  I had shot him right through his heart. 

It was getting late so I quickly walked to the dead bull.  While admiring my relatively young 6 x 6 bull, I looked down the meadow and about 250 yards away there stood the mule deer buck I was looking for.  There was a tree stump nearby, so I quickly got behind the stump for a rest, took careful aim at the buck’s shoulder and squeezed the trigger.  Now we had two bull elk, (Melvin’s 4 x 4 and my 6 x 6) and my 4 x 3 Mule deer buck, all killed with Melvin’s rifle.  Not a bad day of hunting.  We then field dressed my bull and buck, and loaded them on Charlie’s Dodge 4 x 4 pickup and took them to the butcher shop.  The butcher promised to have all the meat processed and frozen by Friday.  By 8:00 that evening we were back in camp for a well-deserved late dinner.  As appetizers, we had fried fresh elk rocky mountain oysters.  They were great with some Jack Daniels and seven. 

Just a sideline about my large bull and the 4 cows.  This was the second hunt that I recall where we had shot into and spooked a large herd with several large bulls early in the morning.  In both cases, in the confusion after the shots, lesser, but still large, bulls would steal a few cows from the herd bull’s harem and separate themselves from the rest of the herd.  This was the same thing my bull did that day.

Clarence Scheel Royal Bull Elk
Clarence Scheel with Royal Bull Elk at his home in New Braunfels

Note that the G6 points are considerably shorter than those of my royal bull l that I wrote about in an earlier article.  This bull was probably two years younger than the first one, but already a desirable trophy.

Now that Melvin and I had filled our tags, we sat in various blinds and observed, hoping to get Charlie in the right spot to get his bull.  Unfortunately that did not happen on this hunt.

On Friday morning we loaded our gear and ATV and headed to the butcher shop to divide the frozen meat.  Charlie, Melvin and I each got a 1/4 of the meat and Charlie took the other 1/4 share with him to Colorado Springs to give to the owners of the ranch.  By sharing the meat with the owners, who do not hunt, we maintain good will and they allow us to come back year after year.  Some years we have good luck as we did on the hunts described in these articles’, but then again, some years we go home empty handed. Either way, it is always a thrill to be able to hunt and enjoy the beautiful landscape of the mountains of Colorado.     

 Just like I had luck on the two hunts I described in these articles, Charlie also had his successful hunts when I was left empty handed. 

The most memorable successful hunt which Charlie had with me occurred in about 1983, before we had built the Charlie’s Nest ground blind.  Charlie was hunting on the trail as it came out of the dark timber on the upper end of the meadow and his nephew Mike was hunting about 100 yards below Charlie at the edge of the wooded area.  Both were overlooking the large meadow.  I was sitting in a tree stand that I had prepared About 20 feet above the ground in a large Ponderosa pine tree on the ridge where we would build Melvin’s nest a few years later mentioned earlier in this article.  From my vantage point I could see Charlie in his orange vest and cap.  We were probably about 600 yards apart.  At about 8 AM I heard a large number of shots coming from the meadow.  After the dust settled, I remained in my tree blind until Charlie and Mike came to me and told me that both he and Mike had gotten bulls.

This photo shows Charlie approaching me sitting in my tree blind to tell me about the two big bulls which he and his nephew, Mike, had just killed.  (Photo taken by Mike.)

 I joined Charlie and he took me to Mike’s 6 x 6 bull which had travelled about 100 yards off the meadow before it laid down and Charlie had finished it off with a final shot.  He then took me to the middle of the large meadow where his monster 7 x 6 bull was laying.  Charlie had shot that bull at about 350 yards shooting from a standing position with no rest.  Mike had shot his at about 250 yards from his position.  Charlie explained that there were 3 big bulls in a group and they got two. What an incredible shot Charlie had made with his 300 Weatherby rifle.  I field dressed two big bulls that day.  On that hunt I went home empty handed.  The next year we built a ground blind (known a Charlie’s Nest) on the north side of the large meadow at the point where the bulls had been when Charlie and Mike had killed them one year earlier.

Charlie’s Nest has been a very productive for all of the hunters on this ranch because the elk often enter the meadow from the bottom or lower end early in the morning and continue about 500 yards to the upper end where they enter the dark timber and continue their journey to their daytime resting area on our neighboring ranch.  In the evening they sometimes reverse their travel coming down into our meadow shortly before dark and continue their journey to the large meadows on the two ranches downhill from our ranch where they graze during the night.

About two years later Charlie was sitting in his nest for the morning hunt during a heavy snow storm.  At about 9 AM, he decided to walk around a bit.  He crossed the 100 yard wide meadow and was looking down into the drainage on the opposite side of the meadow from his nest.  Then he looked back to his nest and there he saw two big bulls right next to the blind where he had been sitting all morning and he had left about 15 minutes earlier.  He killed the bigger one of the two.  It was a 6 x 6.  Again I went home empty handed.  For me it was just as exiting If Charlie was successful as if I had killed a bull.  We always considered it a very successful hunt if one of us got our bull. Only once in those many years that we hunted together did we both get our bull on the same hunt.

I am indeed grateful to my friends who own the ranch for making these hunts possible and above all, memorable.

POC Fishing Report

Well it was supposed to be a sight casting trip, but none of us could turn down the chance to get into the surf for some possible topwater action.

And, as luck would have it, they were mad at the topwaters this morning. Spent most of the day trolling up and down the beach. It has been a long time since we’ve been out there with those kind of conditions. It was definitely a trip to remember after a day of catch and release on trout up to 5 pounds.

Capt. Nathan Beabout

Cell:(210)452-9680

nmsportsmansadventures.com

Capt. Nathan Beabout

Cell: (210) 452-9680

N&M Sportsman’s Adventures

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AB Kennels

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Seadrift/POC Navigational Trips

Whether your just starting out or an experienced fisherman/woman, we offer different levels of our navigational trips.

Today’s trip was the beginning stages, getting use to the boat in different depths as well as learning new area, and setting up a game plan.

But if your confident in all that, and want to learn more of the ins and outs of what makes our bay systems tic. We have that too, for more info on either level of trip, give us a call to set yours up today.

Capt. Nathan Beabout

Cell:(210)452-9680

nmsportsmansadventures.com

Capt. Nathan Beabout

Cell: (210) 452-9680

N&M Sportsman’s Adventures

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AB Kennels

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Seadrift, TX Redfishing

Fun day with this family, celebrating an 11 year old birthday. Who caught the most fish.

We had some good pulls, and saw a handful of good reds, but unfortunately with the slightly elevated tides we were not able to get with in striking range. These fish were pushed up high in the grass chasing finger mullet and grass shrimp.

Looks like after this Low system passes we will have some good winds. If you want to try your hand at sight casting give us a call. Or, if you want to wade, it looks like there will be some good days to fish along the many reefs SA bay has to offer.

All are fish have continued to be released this year, in an effort to help our bays rebound. Thanks to all my clients.

Capt. Nathan Beabout

Cell:(210)452-9680

nmsportsmansadventures.com

Capt. Nathan Beabout

Cell: (210) 452-9680

N&M Sportsman’s Adventures

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AB Kennels

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3 day crew wading Seadrift, TX.

It has been a fun 3 days with these boys from North Texas. We caught a lot of fish on a variety of baits. Topwaters, DSL Victorious Secret, Bass Assassian Morning Glory, and Mirrodine XL’s all saw action.

We made it work with the winds we were delt the first two days. we caught a lot of reds each day. On day two we did manage a couple solid trout and several 17-19” trout. Day three we opted to try a new area. We had a great bite early during the minor feed period. After that the reds turned on.

Our major feed period was slower than normal, but we had some solid redfish during that period.

It is always fun spending multiple days with a group. They got to see and understood the adjustments that took place to be successful, each day under the changing conditions.

Thank y’all gentlemen for releasing the catch over 3 days!

Capt. Nathan Beabout

Cell:(210)452-9680

nmsportsmansadventures.com

Capt. Nathan Beabout

Cell: (210) 452-9680

N&M Sportsman’s Adventures

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AB Kennels

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Seadrift Sight Casting for Big Redfish!

Another cloud cover day, but that didn’t stop us from chasing reds in the marsh. Not only was it this wife’s first time to land a redfish, she had the hot hand of the day.

POC Custom Rods, DSL’s pearl/chart, 1/8 oz DSL jig heads, and a couple gulps worked like a charm.

Redfish Redfish

Capt. Nathan Beabout

Cell: (210) 452-9680

N&M Sportsman’s Adventures

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AB Kennels

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Seadrift, TX. Sight Casting

We had to call an audible today, and wait for storms to pass. But, the wait was well worth it. 
Instead of the sight casting tower, we armed ourselves with popping corks and DSL’s white ice, and gulp shrimp rigged on DSL’s 1/8oz Owner Cutting Point jig head. It was an easy day of trolling shorelines with this repeat client and good friend. 
As a fella who understands how valuable our resource is, he had no issues with releasing fish. He just wanted to feel the pull. Thank you.


Capt. Nathan Beabout

Cell:(210)452-9680

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